All posts filed under: Sufism

Letting go …

  There is some point at which we are connected, regardless  as friend or enemy when we go back far enough we are One.   It’s just a matter of knowing how far to let go or how much to embrace until we arrive where it feels right.   There is no “away” they point out in permaculture circles. Nowhere to throw our trash that is truly gone.   What about love? When it ends, does it go away? I think not. Broken hearts may heal. But what was, the possibility and the pain, remain. Love is eternal.   Is it possible to truly let go? To dive into the sea and be free once more?   Perhaps our Oneness is like the ocean of life that we all are swimming in. As that we are One, but at the same time separate entities. Who choose to create bonds and who can let those dissolve again. Indeed we will stay tied by shared memories.   But once we let go far enough our Oneness is …

Neptune opposite Mars

Neptune is considered to be the great dissolver  in astrology. In my chart Neptune sits right in the middle of my house of relationships (the 7th house) and opposite Mars. My Mars is in Gemini in the first house, the house of the self. I enjoy communicating, am impulsive and start many projects. I am very energetic and self-assertive and I rarely retreat from a conflict. That’s a rough paraphrase of some key points from astro.com, a great site for free charts. I know it is more complex than that. But I’m sure this blog is in part sponsored by Mars in Gemini. Neptune is in Sagitarius in the 7th house, the house of the reflected self or intimate relationships. The sign of noble Truth. That’s like a big, fat, stormy, foggy, ocean cloud sitting in front of God. All I want is to love and know God but first I must swim through the mist and dissolve all that stands in the way. In the meantime there are things that I just don’t understand. …

As long as in love there is “you” and “me”

I read on my friends facebook post: “As long as in love there is “you” and “me”, love is not fully kindled.” ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan. I had planned to post about grief. About how easy it is to slip into the pain of lost love. How I wondered who’s pain it really was that I felt. Was it my pain, or hers, or the pain of the world. But something in this quote woke me up. It’s hard to even find the pain now. Here you are. Enjoy. The Sufi makes no restrictions and has no principles of renunciation, nor does he teach renunciation. He believes that to sacrifice anything in life which one does not wish to sacrifice is of no use, but that renunciation is a natural thing, and grows in one with one’s evolution. A child which cries for its toy at one stage of its childhood, comes to an age when it is quite willing to give away the toy it once cried for. There are three stages of morals. …